Alleged Elderly Victims Speak Out Against Disbarred Attorney

 

In an Orlando Sentinel article by Susan Jacobson entitled Elderly who trusted high-
living couple now face nightmares, former clients spoke out about Ross and Linda Littlefield,
who were “charged with 10 counts of fraudulently using the Lentzes' credit cards, one count
of fraudulently using their personal-identification information and one count of engaging in a
scheme to defraud for at least $20,000 but less than $50,000.” Following are excerpts from the
article:
When her husband's Alzheimer's disease made him so violent that she had to lock
her bedroom door at night to feel safe, Janet Lentz knew it was time to put him in
a nursing home. Heartbroken, alone and unsure how to manage financially, Lentz
turned to Kissimmee elder-care lawyer Linda Vasquez Littlefield to help get
Medicaid for her husband. Five years later, Eugene Lentz is dead; Janet Lentz, 76,
is pinching pennies to survive; and Linda Vasquez has been arrested and
disbarred. Osceola County sheriff's investigators say Vasquez — known as Linda
Littlefield before her divorce in May — used the Lentzes' credit cards to charge
nearly $54,000 worth of office furniture, a vacation in Cancún and a ghostwriting
project for her daughter. More than $43,000 was paid to Littlefield Law Group
using the cards. Vasquez also spent nearly $8,000 from the couple's trust account
to pay the card balances, detectives allege. Lentz hopes Vasquez, 39, gets prison
time for her fraud conviction in the case. Sentencing is Sept. 16. Vasquez's ex-
husband, Ross Littlefield, 46, who ran a trust in which Janet Lentz and dozens of
other seniors placed their money, is scheduled to go to trial, also in September. "I
thought these people really cared for me," Janet Lentz said last week in an
interview at her mobile home at Good Samaritan Village retirement
community. "I was devastated. All I did was sob for days and days." … "They
took all my savings," Lentz said. "They had me believing that I had to turn over
the credit cards and put them in the safe because that was a requirement of
Medicaid."
Linda Balash of Harmony said she had a similar experience when she placed her
parents' money in a pooled trust through JNN Foundation, which Ross Littlefield
ran out of a downtown Kissimmee office building — about to be auctioned off
in a foreclosure sale — that he and his ex-wife own. Balash, who turned over
$120,500 to the trust in 2009, is suing the Littlefields and the foundation on her
folks' behalf. So is Dorothy Enright, who put in nearly $107,000 last year on
behalf of Osceola resident Willa Lorraine, who has since died. In response to
the lawsuit, Ross Littlefield — whose Facebook page lists "greed is good" as a
favorite quote — wrote that his clients were fully informed. The lawsuit alleges
the Littlefields said any money left in the trust after the death of their elderly
clients would be returned to their estates or to their beneficiaries. Balash and
Enright say they found out later that federal law requires that such trusts first
reimburse Medicaid for any expenditures. The lawsuit claims the Littlefields
engaged in deceptive and unfair trade practices, civil theft or exploitation,
racketeering and civil conspiracy. Balash, 61, said she chose the trust while she
was overwhelmed by the sudden responsibility of tending to her parents, who
moved from Deerfield Beach into Balash's east Osceola County home after her
father, 84, had a stroke. He had been caring for Balash's mother, 79, who has
dementia. "When you have situations like that, you are scared and don't know
where to turn," said Balash, a real-estate broker.
Campbell Law is lead counsel for the elderly victims in the Osceola County case of
Dorothy Enright and Linda Balash v. Linda Littlefield, et al. (case number 2011 CA 001979).

In an Orlando Sentinel article by Susan Jacobson entitled Elderly who trusted high-living couple now face nightmares, former clients spoke out about Ross and Linda Littlefield, who were “charged with 10 counts of fraudulently using the Lentzes' credit cards, one count of fraudulently using their personal-identification information and one count of engaging in a scheme to defraud for at least $20,000 but less than $50,000.” Following are excerpts from the article:

When her husband's Alzheimer's disease made him so violent that she had to lock her bedroom door at night to feel safe, Janet Lentz knew it was time to put him in a nursing home. Heartbroken, alone and unsure how to manage financially, Lentz turned to Kissimmee elder-care lawyer Linda Vasquez Littlefield to help get Medicaid for her husband. Five years later, Eugene Lentz is dead; Janet Lentz, 76, is pinching pennies to survive; and Linda Vasquez has been arrested and disbarred. Osceola County sheriff's investigators say Vasquez — known as Linda Littlefield before her divorce in May — used the Lentzes' credit cards to charge nearly $54,000 worth of office furniture, a vacation in Cancún and a ghostwriting project for her daughter. More than $43,000 was paid to Littlefield Law Group using the cards. Vasquez also spent nearly $8,000 from the couple's trust account to pay the card balances, detectives allege. Lentz hopes Vasquez, 39, gets prison time for her fraud conviction in the case. Sentencing is Sept. 16. Vasquez's ex-husband, Ross Littlefield, 46, who ran a trust in which Janet Lentz and dozens of other seniors placed their money, is scheduled to go to trial, also in September. "I thought these people really cared for me," Janet Lentz said last week in an interview at her mobile home at Good Samaritan Village retirement community. "I was devastated. All I did was sob for days and days." … "They took all my savings," Lentz said. "They had me believing that I had to turn over the credit cards and put them in the safe because that was a requirement of Medicaid."

Linda Balash of Harmony said she had a similar experience when she placed her parents' money in a pooled trust through JNN Foundation, which Ross Littlefield ran out of a downtown Kissimmee office building — about to be auctioned off in a foreclosure sale — that he and his ex-wife own. Balash, who turned over $120,500 to the trust in 2009, is suing the Littlefields and the foundation on her folks' behalf. So is Dorothy Enright, who put in nearly $107,000 last year on behalf of Osceola resident Willa Lorraine, who has since died. In response to the lawsuit, Ross Littlefield — whose Facebook page lists "greed is good" as a favorite quote — wrote that his clients were fully informed. The lawsuit alleges the Littlefields said any money left in the trust after the death of their elderly clients would be returned to their estates or to their beneficiaries. Balash and Enright say they found out later that federal law requires that such trusts first reimburse Medicaid for any expenditures. The lawsuit claims the Littlefields engaged in deceptive and unfair trade practices, civil theft or exploitation, racketeering and civil conspiracy. Balash, 61, said she chose the trust while she was overwhelmed by the sudden responsibility of tending to her parents, who moved from Deerfield Beach into Balash's east Osceola County home after her father, 84, had a stroke. He had been caring for Balash's mother, 79, who has dementia. "When you have situations like that, you are scared and don't know where to turn," said Balash, a real-estate broker.

Campbell Law is lead counsel for the elderly victims in the Osceola County case of Dorothy Enright and Linda Balash v. Linda Littlefield, et al. (case number 2011 CA 001979).

 

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